March 09, 2005

‘roid rage

If you are not a sports fan, you might be unaware of the controversy over steroids that has surrounded major-league baseball for many months. Leaked grand jury testimony from a criminal investigation and the usual informed whispers have fueled the pervasive sports punditry up until now. Enter stage Right the United States House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform who announced that they will be holding hearings investigating steroid abuse in the big leagues.

When asking himself the pre-emptive question of why the need for Congressional hearings, chairman of the committee, Tom Davis, evoked several of the standard Vote For Me symbols wishing to shine a light in the darkness and of course protect our children. As sad as that sop was, he went on to add, “We can help kids understand that steroids aren’t cool.” I wish the committee well in that endeavor because I think that convincing teenage boys that a muscular physique is “uncool” is a grand undertaking indeed.

Is it just me, or does anyone else think that perhaps this might not be the best use of the time of our Congressmen?

Laying aside these silly nits, there is a real problem that does need addressed. Steroids are a dangerous thing and like other illegal drugs, they are making their way into the hands of children far to young for society to have any expectation of a reasonable risk/reward analysis on their part. I certainly agree that a program of communication to young people is desirable and justified, but I can not help but wonder if this is not a more appropriate matter for the Surgeon General than the Committee on Government Reform. It sounds like the Reform Committee is overdue a bit of self-examination.

Of course we all know that the truth is that like most of what poses as legitimate legislative activity in the hallowed halls of congress lately, these hearings are intended primarily to be attention getters for the politicians. In elementary school, we called it mugging for the camera. When describing the behavior of our Congressmen, we should just call it embarrassing.

A while back, in an attempt at making some suggestions that could help with the embarrassment that is called our public school system, I called for the removal of sports from our schools in order to help the institution focus on the actual objective of educating. Perhaps the same treatment is in order for our nation as a whole. It is hard to believe that Congress can be this distracted when as a nation we face challenges the magnitude of international terrorism, nuclear missiles in the hands of depots, and an impending meltdown of our health care system. I’m sorry, but as much as I love watching sports, I find the possibility of the end of Western civilization a more compelling topic.

We should be telling Congress to collect autographs on their own time because they have work to do.

But we love our diversions and really, it is hard these days to tell political discourse from sport anyway. The testimony of some of the biggest names in sports before the Congress will undoubtedly attract the approving attention of Americans who care more about who did what to whom than the substantive health concerns. We will be treated to seeing Davis and Henry Waxman preening before the cameras all the while knowing that their media show will not produce anything more than the ongoing criminal investigation is calculated to determine.

And while we are distracted, terrorists will have more time to exploit our exposed borders, North Korea will move a bit closer toward another nuclear tipped missile, and we will waste yet more precious resources into the entropy of an irrational health care system. Perhaps it is naïve to expect more of our leaders and our citizens than this, but one can always hope. Hope that the façade of genuine concern crumbles off of the Capitol Building. Hope that some of those watching The Show will notice that nothing is actually happening.

On the other hand, maybe not.

Play ball!

28 Comments:

Blogger Andrew Dunlap said...

Tony, you're in rare form, weaving roids, spitballs and terrorism in the same post. First, I could give a flip about baseball. I never watch it on tv and rarely watch when I go to the ballpark. I dated a lady who got tickets to the corporate suite, so I would turn my nose up at regular tickets. In days past, I could see how it was a past-time. This was before TV, Espn and the internet. When games were in the daytime. I grew up in Kansas City and the A's were there then. Then the Royals came and it was great going to what was then a state of the art ballpark. But this was before multi-kazillion dollar free agents. We had Frank White, a local kid who made it to the big leagues, we won the 1985 series and now will never have a chance to do it again, ever. Ok, enough of that. I was on steroids for quite a long time, because of arthritis. Not the same as what the big league players use, but on occasion, I would find myself more than a little irritable. The game has become so diluted in talent, that the owners are now paying big money for 300 hitters or as the song says, the chicks like the long ball. With little or no oversight by the owners, players were looking for an edge. The owners really don't care because it was all about the bling bling. Baseball owners have always been feudalistic in their thinking. It was outside pressure that forced them to make changes.
Now about terrorists: You're right. Congress wants to grandstand with the big boys while the terrorists stroll across our borders. I have a theory, we do what comes easiest. When I was in school back in the day, I forced myself to to do the things that were the most difficult first. Even now, I find that if you bill your customer and collect the money, you'll spend less time, wringing your hands about how to pay your own bills. It's not always easy but it works. The problem with addressing terrorists is that closing a porous border is hard, especially when you have a constituency of 35 million or so people who came through that hole. The fact is that illegal immigration has to be addressed. Hey, I'm all for immigration and diversity, but hell, we can't have a y'all come policy.

6:45 PM  
Blogger stilldreamn said...

Just got back from a trip to the land of hanging chads and was delighted to see your post. My reaction to this high level investigation was a resounding "huh?" Steroid abuse is a Federal concern? Fairness in sports requires congressional action? Oh please, it would be funny if it was someone else's country, but.....

IF we de-emphasized youth sports, we'd eliminate the youth steroid use. Let the pros get themselves torqued up all they want, let their industry deal with it. I agree about school sports---I notice our local schools manage to fund competitive sports, but have no physical education program to speak of past middle school. If you aren't on the team, you're pretty much left alone with your twinkies and video games.

And get the pom and cheer squads off ESPN while you're at it. Before we abandoned public school for homeschooling, one of our daughters got on the "Dance Team." This is a commercialized money pit of the highest caliber. It also is one sleazy business, as you know if you've observed these "dancers" on ESPN at Orlando (yes, all these competitions culminate in trips to Orlando $$$)

It's no wonder the school day continues to stretch and the school year needs to be lengthened with all these useless (yes, useless) activities.

Back to our intrepid arbiters of fairness---have you ever read the short story "Harrison Bergeron" by Vonnegut? An excerpt:

THE YEAR WAS 2081, and everybody was finally equal. They weren’t only equal before God and the law. They were equal every which way. Nobody was smarter than anybody else. Nobody was better looking than anybody else. Nobody was stronger or quicker than anybody else. All this equality was due to the 211th, 212th, and 213th Amendments to the Constitution, and to the unceasing vigilance of agents of the United States Handicapper General.

Think about it.

6:45 PM  
Blogger Common Good said...

Curm,

Are you trying to tell us that there are more important stuff for congress to deal with than prima donna steroid use and exposed Super Bowl tits? Good god man... get a grip. Next your going to tell me $ million dollar college coach salaries and $ million dollar highschool football stadiums make no sense. What are you... a frickin communist?

btw... You can get rid of all sports except college basketball. If you try that, I will hunt you down and hurt you. The best sports event of the year is March Madness... there isn't even a close second.

stilldreamin... totally equal would be boring. Bottom dwellers all eating and getting healthcare... not boring. :)

btw Curm... consider that the GOP has decided that bankruptcy law that effects the credit card companies is a top priority. Note, not all bankruptcies. The kind where the corporation gets to wipe out the stock holders, pensions and debt... the kind where the same CEO stays in place with the same pay... living to make millions after the flush... those kinds of BK not on the table. The GOP... looking after the little guy with their every move.

7:15 PM  
Blogger Common Good said...

Curm,

Are you trying to tell us that there are more important stuff for congress to deal with than prima donna steroid use and exposed Super Bowl tits? Good god man... get a grip. Next your going to tell me $ million dollar college coach salaries and $ million dollar highschool football stadiums make no sense. What are you... a frickin communist?

btw... You can get rid of all sports except college basketball. If you try that, I will hunt you down and hurt you. The best sports event of the year is March Madness... there isn't even a close second.

stilldreamin... totally equal would be boring. Bottom dwellers all eating and getting healthcare... not boring. :)

btw Curm... consider that the GOP has decided that bankruptcy law that effects the credit card companies is a top priority. Note, not all bankruptcies. The kind where the corporation gets to wipe out the stock holders, pensions and debt... the kind where the same CEO stays in place with the same pay... living to make millions after the flush... those kinds of BK not on the table. The GOP... looking after the little guy with their every move.

Andrew, everytime the baseball players or hockey players go on strike... I pray it really is the end of their sport. Wouldn't that be a hoot... some millionaire prima donnas actually get dumb enough to kill their own golden goose. pawaaaaa!!!!

7:16 PM  
Blogger Randy P said...

Honestly, I have no sympathy for someone that makes upwards of $25 mil a year. I do agree that the salaries of years gone by were not good enough, but talk about a pendulum swing. Roids, my brother took roids in highschool, and made my Mom's life a living h***. It was horrible. I was in the Marine Corps at the time, and she was having so much trouble with him she just started drinking and retreating into an alcohol induced lifestyle. And my Dad bore the brunt of all this for 15 years. I really respect my Dad, and my Mom, she kicked it and they are both happier than ever. Roids are stupid, but to spend congressional dollars on a private org like MLB, crazy. They are big boys and can do what they want, and honestly until Canseco came out and fronted everyone, we all guessed, but never really knew. Until then how many people did you know for sure who was taking and who was not. It would be better off if we kept things in the closet

8:00 AM  
Blogger Tony Plank said...

I almost did not write on this subject just because of this result. Everybody pretty much agrees. Not too much controversy here I'm afraid.

For the record, I'm not a baseball fan myself either, though I do find myself a bit more interested than when I was younger.

On a side note, there is no need to **** out profanity here. While I don't really encourage it either, I think we are all adults. I don't censor and have trouble imagining the post that would cause it. I suppose if something were profane AND pointless I'd perhaps consider censoring if it were anonymous-but I doubt it.

9:04 AM  
Blogger Tony Plank said...

I almost did not write on this subject just because of this result. Everybody pretty much agrees. Not too much controversy here I'm afraid.

For the record, I'm not a baseball fan myself either, though I do find myself a bit more interested than when I was younger.

On a side note, there is no need to **** out profanity here. While I don't really encourage it either, I think we are all adults. I don't censor and have trouble imagining the post that would cause it. I suppose if something were profane AND pointless I'd perhaps consider censoring if it were anonymous-but I doubt it.

9:05 AM  
Blogger Prof. Ricardo said...

Mr. Plank said: “there is no need to **** out profanity here.”

But now you yourselves are to put off all these: anger, wrath, malice, blasphemy, filthy language out of your mouth. (Col.3:8)

P.R. Dept.

4:17 PM  
Blogger John said...

Well, Tony ought to be pretty damned glad that he wasn't a member of the church at Colossae. Paul would have had a helluva time reigning in bloggers.

Context, Ricardo, context.

4:44 PM  
Blogger stilldreamn said...

"..anger, wrath, malice, blasphemy, filthy language"

Hey, 3 out of 5 ain't bad. I'll pass on the blasphemy & filthy language, and raise your malice, wrath & anger.

Here's Answers.com's definition of "curmudgeon"

"An ill-tempered person full of resentment and stubborn notions"

Sounds pretty wrathful, angry and malicious to me. My, I'm thankful I'm not a curmudgeon, but I have been called a B****. Considering the source and context, I believe it was a compliment.

5:21 PM  
Blogger stilldreamn said...

"totally equal would be boring. Bottom dwellers all eating and getting healthcare... not boring. :)"

Alas, I was misunderstood---I DO believe there should be a safety net. In my utopian dream world, the Christians (among others) would provide it voluntarily as they lived out their faith. Or are you afraid they won't step up to the plate? Maybe they'd prefer to build a bowling alley for their own members instead of rehabbing inner city housing and sponsoring health clinics? Look at the money that streamed to the tsunami victims from private charities and individuals. IF gov't wasn't doing our job for us (with our money!), maybe we'd take it on.

I won't ask you to define "bottom-dwellers", look what happened to Bill Cosby.

Hugs.

5:36 PM  
Blogger Common Good said...

DreaminStill..

I've hugged Curm once in 20+ years. I'm not really the hugging kind.

"Or are you afraid they won't step up to the plate?"

Two repsonses:

1) Our nation is much to complex for a 100% private volunteer charity system to work. It's just not possible, and the sooner we quit fighting about it... the sooner we can do private what can be, and public what has to be.

2) It isn't the Christian's plate. Many people need help that are not Christians. It is unacceptable for Common Good (which is federal by defintion) to be delivered through one faction's filter. If I ever needed my federal common good (for example Social Security disability) I would consider it immoral to have to file a request with the church network... I expect it from my government.

The quicker we figure out government isn't the enemy, and the religious right need not be the enemy, the quicker we can evolve. Until then, we are just stuck in cave dweller mode (not to be confused with bottom dwellers). Bottom dwellers = those who have fallen through the cracks of capitalism and are dependent on the trickle down of those who have not.

Hive fives... :)

btw... a little birdie told me Curm will be back on Monday to tend to his flock.

6:11 PM  
Blogger someone else said...

I have loved baseball; I have loved the drama of it, the narrative, the deep and seemingly mystical stories that go into it. Most recently, I witnessed what I believed to be the most dramatically perfect reality that I had ever seen assembled in the Game 7 home run by Aaron Boone (worst hitter of the series up to that point) off of Tim Wakefield (best pitcher of the series up to that point) in the 2003 ALCS between the Yankees and Boston. I have also prayed during baseball (86 mets, game 6). I have witnessed (in replay, fell asleep) what I believed to be a miracle for many years (see above).

Point being, I have an interest in baseball, although it's not as strong as it used to be. I didn't like this corruption of the game, even though it was clear years ago that something weird (expansion? juiced ball?) was going on when minor players started hitting 45 home runs a year.

This, combined with the fact that nothing that comes out of this Congress could possibly be good, makes me Thanks God Almighty that they're choosing to waste their time with this. If they weren't, they would have more time to do things like cut food stamps (today's example of the degradation of Homo Americanus elitus).

A more interesting point, though, is that baseball is a little bit more than just another industry. I'll admit, that like many societal institutions, its lost some lustre over the past couple of decades. Even so, it still has anti-trust exemption, it still has intimate ties to politicians (e.g. the President's father was rumored to be a commissioner candidate at one point and the President was the owner of the Texas Rangers). It's sort of quasi-governmental in nature; a semi-public apparatus of the state that used to be used more effectively to promote patriotism. So, it seems like it strikes more of a chord with Congress when MLB errs than Enron. I guess they haven't figured out that it would be more cost-effective to spend tax payer money on the NFL for more effective delivery of results (e.g. better response to troop recruitment).

4:47 AM  
Blogger Tony Plank said...

On Filthy Language

Lets be clear here since I’ve been called out. I don’t ENDORSE bad language, but I’ll tolerate it. Big difference.

It is my fervent belief that only a free exchange of ideas is useful. Once you start editing, that is a slipper slope that leads to a stunted debate and lack of interest. It is also a matter of common sense. The offensiveness differential between “go to Hell” and “go to H#*L” is exactly zero.

I think it is more mature to just recognize that even the puritans let a colorful metaphor rip from time to time and just move past it. For the most part obscenities detract from one’s argument so anyone using them does so at their own peril. To me, that is the real limit on inappropriate language: embarrassing one’s self by diminishing or nullifying the argument. In other words, feel free to salt your language, but do so at your own peril.

Lastly, I would add that I am amazed how often this topic seems to come up in our society. Seems a bit trivial to me, but at continuing theme nonetheless.

9:06 AM  
Blogger Tony Plank said...

Saurav said, “…nothing that comes out of this Congress could possibly be good, makes me Thanks God Almighty that they're choosing to waste their time with this.”

Here, here! I have said this often over the last decade or so. Everybody lamented deadlock, but not I. Congress has become worthless. Unless there is some radical change of substance in the institution, inaction is far more satisfactory than action. And in the final analysis, that is an extraordinarily sad state of affairs.

9:40 AM  
Blogger Andrew Dunlap said...

John: I couldn't help but take notice of your comment about Colossians. Does Paul have any authority to tell us to clean up our mouths? I admit that I haven't fully gained control of using expletives, but I agree that it is not virtuous. At the same time, I understand those who use it as part of their daily vocabulary. I wouldn't say I tolerate it, but if I'm in public and I hear some young folks dropping the f bomb, I don't try and stop them. I used to shoot hoops with a guy who was a new convert. When we were on the court, there was considerable trash-talking, but I never joined in. He took note of it and begin to watch his language. Why should we not curse? Because the words we use create an atmosphere. The same is true abut the sexual images we are bombarded with. It's tough not to objectify women. I think the great thing about walking in the Spirit is that you don't have to conform to the world just because you're surrounded by it. I censor what I see and hear all the time, because I have the power to choose not to be bombarded with everything out there. Yet, I can go to a movie and hear profanity and still be able to get the essence of the movie. I think what I hear Tony saying is that profanity is not a problem in his life, so he doesn't want to beat down others who have that problem. That's cool with me. On the other hand, we as Christians should acknowledge the standards that God teaches us in His word, even if we don't agree with them or practice them perfectly. The danger of not doing this, is a hardened heart toward God. I'd rather struggle with living up to the standard than ignoring it.

1:34 PM  
Blogger John said...

Andrew-

I think my post was just a failed attempt at humor. Of course, in answer to your question, the point I was making was that Paul wasn't speaking to us , but to the church at Colossae. One of the first things you quickly learn when you start translating Paul's letters, is that he had a bit of a potty mouth himself. I've made this case before on the misadventure known as the Wilderblog. The point is that Paul is saying that if offensive language (and he wasn't necessarily referring to "damns," "hells," etc.) offends those around you, then you should be sacrificial enough to limit that part of yourself, for the sake of the other. Is there something inherently wrong with a profanity? No, but if it is offensive to those around you, then their preferences have to be considered.

2:16 PM  
Blogger Andrew Dunlap said...

Come on John, of course there is something inherently wrong with profanity, that's why it's profane. Just start dropping the f bomb around everybody and see how they react. There are certain words that are patently offensive. The f word is one of them. To say that words are not inherently offensive is to say that x rated pornography is not offensive. Every word has a meaning and conveys certain ideas, thoughts or emotions. Sorry, I can't let you slide on this one. I'm not talking about damn or hell, which aren't the best words to use, but we all know where the line is. Not only should we not use those words, we should not let them abide in our thoughts. Now, before you accuse me of legalism, we all know that God's standards of morality are unattainable in our own strength. The bible is quite clear that we should avoid filthy language, beahvior and thoughts. When we find ourselves failing, it's an indicator that we need God's help to transform our minds. I don't recall Paul having a potty mouth. I'm sure you're making reference to his use of the menstrual rag metaphor, or the reference to dung. Not pretty, but they were used to make a point. That's a far cry from people who use the f word or the s word gratuitiously. I think the over-arching message is to be both kind and gracious when speaking with others. Is frickin' the same as the other f word? It's pretty close but not nearly as offensive. I think the idea is that we may use slang terms to express anger, disgust or frustration but when we use the f word as an adjective, noun, pronoun, prefix, suffix and every other part of a sentence, we've crossed the line.

2:54 PM  
Blogger Tony Plank said...

Andrew,

I pretty much agree. I grew up around a lot of legalism. Got my mouth washed with soap over “darn it”. What amazes me is that there are a lot of things far more offensive than “obscenities” that we deal with every day. Ill-mannered behavior by drivers in traffic comes to mind. Bring back thoughts about the hardest working boob in showbiz.

If I were empowered to make choices about suitable content for television, I’d take some bare boobs long before things like Jerry Springer and Girl’s Gone Wild paid television promotions. We are really stupid how we approach obscenity.

3:11 PM  
Blogger John said...

Andrew,

I didn't say profanity wasn't offensive, it clearly is to many people. I did say that there isn't anything inherently wrong with profanity. I don't see the correlation between a curse word and pornography. Porn objectifies human beings, particularly women. How exactly does profanity do that? They are not equal.

Regarding the "line" you speak about with profanity-are you saying that it's okay to use some curse words and not others, especially if we are trying to make a point like Paul? So I can say "dammit, get out of the street!" if my child is about to be hit by a car, but I can't use another profanity if I stub my toe? Or can I only say "dammit" or "hell" if I stub my toe, so long as I avoid the more "severe" curse words. This seems confusing to me.

Cursing has been a skill of theologians through the centuries (especially Martin Luther), even through to today (just listen to a lecture by Stanley Hauerwas-Time Magazine's "Best Theologian" in 2001), and it's not something I intend to give up easily (except when I'm around my father, who, though he laughs, doesn't always appreciate my rather unique combinations. I think we're just going to have to agree to disagree here. Now, on to some work.

3:29 PM  
Blogger Common Good said...

This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

6:57 PM  
Blogger Common Good said...

California gets it right --


""The denial of marriage to same-sex couples appears impermissibly arbitrary," wrote San Francisco Superior Court Judge Richard Kramer. "Simply put, same-sex marriage cannot be prohibited solely because California has always done so."

To that, I would say ... f******* right, and f****** about time. :) Sticks and stones, sticks and stones. I will take a potty mouthed society of equal rights any day over puritanical clean mouthed traditional intolerance.

6:58 PM  
Blogger Prof. Ricardo said...

Sorry to derail the topic. Just a quick interjection of scripture. It was either relevant or not.

Re: Steroids.

Of course the reason we don’t want ‘roids is fairness. It’s not fair to give some one a chemical advantage over another. So we ban them within the sport to level the playing field.

What about areas that don’t demand fairness?

My brother said about a decade ago that we ought to have an all-drug Olympics. Let’s see what chemicals and stupid dedicated people can do. In addition to the NFL and AFL, we could have the ADFL (All Drug Football League).

And what about the military? Imagine an infantry made up of muscle-bound men with attitude problems.

Prof. Ricardo

8:45 AM  
Blogger Tony Plank said...

Prof,

Well, I really don’t care one way or another about steroids in terms of whether they should be allowed in sports or not. Actually, I care a bit because I suppose they are setting patterns that youngsters will follow. Clearly, I think their use should be legal regardless of what the leagues decide. Regardless, in the real world they are going to be used and policing what should be permitted (or not) is futile.


CG,

Well, as I have said often, I disagree that California got it “right”. Right would mean that the state is not involved in sanctioning any religious institution.

9:07 AM  
Blogger Common Good said...

Semi-OT:

Over the weekend, I saw Duke's coach K on a TV commercial (some financial company or insurance), and saw Bobby Knight sporting an O'Reilly Auto Parts logo on his sweater. I think coach K was the first one I ever saw make endorsement money... I think his entire team sponsored Nike at one time. Is it just me that wants to hurl when I see their lips movings saying stuff like ... "it's about the kids". Bobby Knight has made himself the show rather than "the kids" his entire career. Why isn't that a bigger issue in our culture rather than pro baseball steroid use. The Temple coach sent out a "goon" to hurt the other team... which resulted in a broken arm on the opposing team. He is now being allowed to coach his team in the NIT. Seems to me addressing our "star culture" would serve more long term good in our society than much of the other things we put at the top of the list.

9:11 AM  
Blogger Andrew Dunlap said...

I'm not mad at Coach K or Bobby Knight for hawking all the goods and services they can, they should make all the money they can for being famous and succesful. Several coaches just got the ax for not winning and some may never be able to get those lucrative deals again. As far as the star culture goes, not much can be done about that. There are incredibly strict rules in place in the NCAA and if anyone gets caught cheating , they pay. As far as the student -athlete goes, one can argue that they are paid professionals.
I'm a KU alumn and real proud of our program, both because of it's success and the fact that we graduate most of our b-ball players. We've got a ton of them playing in the NBA and they are mega millionaires. As long as everyone plays by the rules, it's cool with me. Everyone wants to point to the kid who never graduates, etc. Hey, there are a lot of non-athletes who never graduate. Sports are all about entertainment. They are not a metaphor for life.

11:18 AM  
Blogger Common Good said...

Andrew...

Anyone who accepts the behavior of college basketball coaches today, has no right to ever start a sentence with "the players should be role models". I could live with that bargain, because I also view college atheletes and sports as entertainment.... i.e. not role models. Teachers, cops, firemen, parents, etc. should be role models... not atheletes. You just have to be consistent... you can't let a Bobby Knight slide, and then in the next sentence demand role models from atheletes, college or professional. I used to laugh out loud when they suggested our millionaire NBA players should be role models (those guys living in the Houston strip clubs and spawning kids out of wedlock).

We will just have to agree to disagree on state college coach salaries and personal endorsements based on college employment. I guess Duke is a private school, which would alter my stance... or not. :)

btw... Sorry that my Cowboys took out your Jayhawks in KC. :) The two games they played against each other this year were awsome. I think the first game was one of the best college basketball games I ever watched.

I filled out two NCAA brackets on the ESPN website.... one based in my best guess, and the other based on what I hope for. My best guess final four is Illinois, Wake, Duke and North Carolina.... Illinois beats Duke 70-69 in the final. In my second bracket, I have OSU, Gonzaga, Duke and North Carolina... OSU beating Duke in the final. I think North Carolina has the best talent, but they have a mental issue with Duke. NC was very lucky to win the second game. Duke isn't very deep.. but it doesn't matter as much in the NCAA tournament. KU is very good, Simien probably the best in the nation... but they go cold to often on offense. OSU is about as good an offensive team in the nation, but they aren't quite big enough.... although Joey Graham benches 410 lbs. 410 lbs... holy ****, that's more than anyone on the OSU football team. Good thing is such an even tempered lad. :)

1:56 PM  
Blogger Common Good said...

Andrew,

This thread is probably already dead... but I had an additional comment about college sports. The term student-athelete is (and has been) a total oxymoron. College atheletes are a mixed bag... some there for college also, and some there simply as the minor leagues for professional sports aspirations. It's always been a very bad idea to house that mixture on campus (i.e. sports dorms). Here is my solution, and I've said this for 20+ years. College atheletes should be paid... at least an amount equal to scholarship awards. Any athelete MAY choose to also be a student... but it isn't mandatory. If an athelete chooses to be a student, and gets accepted through the same criteria and process any other student must meet... then they get all student rights (i.e. allowed to live on campus). All non-student atheletes should never be allowed to live on campus... even if that means the school funds non-campus housing. It's always been unproductive (and sometimes dangerous) to label some college atheletes as students. College atheletics is the entertainment business... not part of the education business... time to stop the hypocrisy.

8:49 AM  

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